Ended on the 18th March 2021
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Appendices

Appendix A: Draft Monitoring Framework

Chapter

Relevant Policies

Monitoring Indicator

Target

Source

Chapter 1:

A Spatial Strategy for Watford

Policy SS1.1 Spatial Strategy

Percent of floorspace on previously developed land

90% employment, 80% residential

Planning applications

Number of jobs

13,000 jobs provided 2018-2036

Planning applications

Completions data, for the

Core Development Area

Rest Of Town

N/A

Planning applications

Chapter 2: Core Development Area

Policy CDA2.1: Watford Gateway Strategic Development Area; Policy CDA2.2: Town Centre Strategic Development Area; Policy CDA2.3: Colne Valley Strategic Development Area

Net additional home completions within each Strategic Development Area

Number of allocated homes

Planning applications

Net office and industrial floor space within each Strategic Development Area

Amount of allocated office / industrial floor space

Planning applications

Chapter 3: Homes for a Growing Community

Policy HO3.1 Housing Provision

Net completed dwellings and number of dwellings granted planning permission.

14,274 dwellings 2018-2036 with 793 per year

Maintain 5 year housing supply

Planning applications and site visits

Policy HO3.2 Housing Mix, Density and Optimising Use of Land

Density of residential developments (dph)

95+ dph within the Core Development Area and 45+ dph elsewhere in the town

Planning applications

Percentage of family sized units

20% of all new homes to be family sized (three bedrooms or more)

Planning applications

Policy HO3.3 Affordable Housing

Percentage breakdown of affordable housing

35% of all residential units on sites of 10 or more dwellings to be affordable.

Planning applications

Policy HO3.4 Build to Rent

Number of discounted market rent units

35% of all residential units (on sites of 10 or more dwellings) to be discounted market rent

Planning applications

Policy HO3.9 Residential Conversions

Number of conversions refused planning permission based on exceeding 10% exceeding threshold

N/A

Planning applications

Number of conversions permitted

N/A

Planning applications

Policy HO3.5 Specialist Housing and Care Homes

Number of specialist and care bed spaces completed

102 bed spaces

Planning applications

Policy HO3.6 Student and Co-Living Housing

Number of student bed spaces completed

N/A

Planning applications

Policy HO3.8 Gypsies and Travellers

Number of pitches granted planning permission

Fulfil the identified need for 2 pitches if required

Planning applications

Policy HO3.7 Self-Build and Custom Housebuilding

Number of self-build plots provided and completed

Proposals for 20 houses or more to provide a plot to contribute towards meeting the needs of people on the self-build and customhouse building list

Planning applications

Policy HO3.10 Building Standards for New Homes

Delivery of accessible homes.

All new homes to comply with M4(2) standard, 10% to comply with M4(3) standard and 2% of new homes on developments of 50 dwellings or more to be dementia friendly.

Planning applications

Chapter 4: A Strong Economy

Policy EM4.2 Designated Industrial Areas

Loss of B class floorspace

No net loss

Planning applications

Policy EM4.3 Office Development

E class office floorspace

No net loss

Planning applications

Policy EM4.4 Economic Development Outside Designated Employment Locations

Loss of B class floorspace (outside designated areas)

No net loss

Planning applications

Chapter 5: A Vibrant Town

Policy VT5.1 Supporting Vibrant Retail Centres

Percent of uses which are retail, office and leisure.

N/A

Planning applications

Maintain active ground floor uses

N/A

Annual shop survey

Policy VT5.3 Local Centres

Maintain level of active ground floor uses

N/A

Annual shop survey

Policy HC12.3 Built Cultural and Community Facilities

Number of community facilities

N/A

Annual shop survey

Chapter 6: An Attractive Town

Policy QD6.2 Design Principles; Policy QD6.3 Public Realm; Policy QD6.4 Building Design

Number of planning applications refusals based on design grounds

N/A

Planning applications

Policy QD6.5 Building Height

Number of buildings granted and refused planning permission that exceed the base building height

N/A

Planning applications

Chapter 7: The Historic Environment

Policy HE7.2 Designated Heritage Assets; Heritage and The Historic Environment,

Policy HE7.3 Non-Designated Heritage Assets; Policy HE7.4 Archaeology

Number of buildings on the at Risk Register

Reduce number on the risk register

Risk register

Number of applications granted planning permission contrary to advice from Historic England

N/A

Planning applications

Chapter 8: A Climate Emergency

Policy CC8.1 Mitigating Climate Change and Reducing Carbon Emissions

Number of new residential developments which meet carbon emission reduction standards

19% energy efficiency above Part L of the Building Regulations (2013)

Planning applications and post completion certificates

Percentage of carbon reduction since 2008

40% reduction by 2030

UK local authority and regional carbon dioxide emissions national statistics

Policy CC8.2 Sustainable Construction Standards for Non-Residential Development

Percentage of non-residential developments which meet BREEAM standards

100% of developments meeting either excellent of very good

Planning applications

Policy CC8.3 Sustainable Construction and Resource Management

New homes achieving 110 litres per person per day

100% of new homes

Planning applications

Policy CC8.4 Managing Air Quality

Number of Air Quality Monitoring Areas

Reduction in number of Air Quality Management Areas

Planning applications

Policy CC8.5 Managing the Impacts of Development

Number of planning permissions refused on pollution grounds

Zero refusals

Planning applications

Chapter 9: Improving the Natural Environment

Policy NE9.3 Blue Infrastructure Network; Policy NE9.4 Flood Risk and Mitigation; Policy NE9.5 Surface Water Management

Number of Environment Agency objections to planning applications

No planning permissions granted contrary to the advice of the Environment Agency on flooding and water quality grounds

Planning applications

Policy NE9.2 Green Infrastructure Network; Policy NE9.6 Protecting Open Space; Policy NE9.7 Providing New Open Space

Area of designated green infrastructure

No net loss of green infrastructure

Planning applications

Chapter 10: Infrastructure

Policy IN10.1 Integrated Infrastructure Delivery

Delivery of infrastructure set out in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan

N/A

Planning applications and

infrastructure funding statements

Policy IN10.2 Providing Infrastructure to Support New Development

Delivery of infrastructure set out in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan

N/A

Planning applications and

infrastructure funding statements

Policy IN10.3 Development Contributions

Contributions paid on new developments

N/A

Section 106 agreements, planning applications and

infrastructure funding statements

Chapter 11: A Sustainable Travel Town

Policy ST11.1 Sustainable Travel Town

Percentage of new housing within 400m of a bus stop or rail station

100%

Planning applications

Policy ST11.2 Protecting and Enhancing Future Public Transport Routes and Watford Junction Station Area as a Transport Hub

Percentage of new developments granted planning permission with policy-compliant cycle parking provision.

100%

Planning applications

Policy ST11.4 A Walking and Cycling Infrastructure Improvement Town

Percentage of people walking and cycling for transport

Increase on baseline levels

HCC travel survey

Policy ST11.5 Electric Vehicles, Car Parking and Car Clubs

Percentage of electric vehicles within the borough's total car ownership mix

Increase on baseline levels

Department for Transport

Level of car ownership

Policy ST11.6 Managing the Transport Impacts of Development

Percentage of developments which have an active Travel Plan

Increase on baseline levels

Planning applications

Chapter 12: A Healthy Community

Policy HC12.2 Health Impact Assessments

Number of Health Impact Assessments completed

All schemes over 100 dwellings

Planning applications


Appendix B: Housing Trajectory

Year

Commitments (completions and extant permissions)

Housing Completions from site allocations

Windfall allowance

Annual housing completions

Cumulative housing completions

2018/19

268

0

0

268

268

2019/20

262

0

0

262

530

2020/21

235

0

0

235

765

2021/22

676

771

139

1,586

2,351

2022/23

676

759

139

1,574

3,925

2023/24

676

684

139

1,499

5,424

2024/25

676

757

139

1,572

6,996

2025/26

676

611

139

1,426

8,422

2026/27

0

881

140

1,021

9,443

2027/28

0

553

140

693

10,136

2028/29

0

916

140

1,056

11,192

2029/30

0

687

140

827

12,019

2030/31

0

444

140

584

12,603

2031/32

0

493

140

633

13,236

2032/33

0

365

140

505

13,741

2033/34

0

275

140

415

14,156

2034/35

0

212

140

352

14,508

2035/36

0

340

140

480

14,988

Total

4,145

8,745

2,095

14,988

14,988


Appendix C: Transport Infrastructure Requirements

Infrastructure

Description

Colne Valley Strategic Development Area

20mph Speed Limit

On all internal roads, with design appropriate to low speeds.

Internal Walking and Cycling Links

Linking town centre, Bushey Arches, Oxhey, Vicarage Road, Watford General Hospital and Riverwell.

High Street Sustainable Transport Hub

At junction of High Street / Water Lane to provide interchange for multiple modes.

Junction Improvement

Revised layout of Waterfields Way / Lower High Street junction to improve visibility of signals and safety of all road users.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

Bus Prioritisation

Bus priority along the length of Lower High Street, extending around Exchange Road / Beechen Grove Gyratory.

Cycle and Walking Access

Enhanced cycle infrastructure along length of Lower High Street.

Enhanced Public Realm

At Lower High Street / Exchange Road junction.

Bushey Arches

Cycle and Walking Access

To Bushey Station through Oxhey Park and linking to enhanced provision on Lower High Street, reducing severance of Bushey Arches Gyratory.

Bus Prioritisation

Bus priority along the length of Lower High Street.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

St Albans Road

Cycle and Walking Access

Enhanced cycle infrastructure along St Albans Road. Crossing improvements for both walking and cycling at Langley Road / St Albans Road junction.

Bus Prioritisation

Along length of St Albans Road from, and including, Dome Roundabout to town centre.

Riverwell

20mph Speed Limit

On all internal roads, with design appropriate to low speeds.

Internal Walking and Cycling Links

Linking Watford General Hospital, Stripling Way, Thomas Sawyer Way and Ebury Way.

Cycle and Walking Access

Cycling infrastructure improvements along Vicarage Road between Hagden Lane and Fearnley Street.

Cycling infrastructure improvements along Harwoods Road, Chester Road, Queens Avenue and Whippendell Road linking Watford General Hospital and Ascot Road.

Bus Prioritisation

Along Vicarage road between Hagden Lane and Fearnley Street.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

Ascot Road

Internal Walking and Cycling Links

Connecting Croxley View, Greenhill Crescent, Tolpits Lane, Watford Station, and all weather access to the Ebury Way from Tolpits Lane and King George V Playing Field.

Cycle and Walking Access

Re-surfacing of the Ebury Way.

Cycling infrastructure improvements along Vicarage Road between Hagden Lane and Fearnley Street.

Cycling infrastructure improvements along Harwoods Road, Chester Road, Queens Avenue and Whippendell Road linking Watford General Hospital and Ascot Road.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

Town Centre Strategic Development Area

20mph Speed Limit

On all internal roads, with design appropriate to low speeds.

Internal Walking and Cycling Links

Across town centre both north / south and east / west.

Cycle and Walking Access

Overcome ring road severance via pedestrian and cycle crossing improvements at gateways to the town centre: Derby Road, Water Lane, Lower High Street, Vicarage Rd and Market Street.

Enhanced cycle infrastructure along Hempstead Road.

Enhanced cycle infrastructure along St Albans Road and Rickmansworth Road.

Junction Improvement

Full signalisation of Beechen Grove / Rickmansworth Rd roundabout and improved lane guidance and signage.

Bus Prioritisation

Bus prioritisation on the Exchange Road / Beechen Grove Gyratory.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

Watford Gateway Strategic Development Area

20mph Speed Limit

On all internal roads, with design appropriate to low speeds.

Eastern Mobility Hub and Station

Bridge

Eastern mobility hub at Watford Junction station with a new multi-storey car park, a new station bridge connecting the two platforms and infrastructure provision for vulnerable road users. Improved access to the new hub along Imperial Way, Clive Way and Reeds Crescent/ Orphanage Road.

Western Station Access Priority

Reallocation and bus station

upgrade

Prioritise pedestrian, cycle and bus movements whilst limiting through traffic at the western station entrance. Improvements to bus priority around the bus station.

Penn Road Connectivity and

Station Access Improvements

New pedestrian bridge and cycle bridge over the Abbey Line to connect Penn Road and Colonial Way, improvements to station access for vulnerable users, improvements to the station car park access.

Bradshaw Road Quietway

Link for vulnerable road users from Watford Junction Station through the new Station Quarter West development and Bradshaw Road to Balmoral Road.

Mass Rapid Transit

To support route as developed by Hertfordshire County Council.

Cycle and Walking Access

Crossing improvements at Langley Road / St Albans Road and Hempstead Road / Stratford Way junctions to improve connectivity for cyclists.

Enhanced cycle infrastructure along St Albans Road.


Appendix D: Cycle Parking Standards

Use Class

High Sustainability Area

Other Areas


Minimums

Residential

Long-Term (employee / resident)

Short-Term (visitor)

Long-Term (employee / resident)

Short-Term (visitor)

C2 Residential Institutions

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 20 units

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 20 units

C3 Dwelling House 1 Bed

C3 Dwelling House 2 Bed

C3 Dwelling House 3+ Bed

1.25 spaces per unit

2.00 spaces per unit

2.50 space per unit

1 space per 20 units

1.25 spaces per unit

1.75 spaces per unit

2.25 spaces per unit

1 space per 20 units

C4 Houses and Multiple Occupation

1 space per 2 bedrooms

1 space per 20 units

1 space per 2 bedrooms

1 space per 20 units

Non-Residential

Long-Term (employee)

Short-Term (student / visitor)

Long-Term (employee)

Short-Term (student / visitor)

B2 General Industrial

1 space per 150 sqm

1 space per 1000 sqm

1 space per 250 sqm

1 space per 1000 sqm

B8 Storage and Distribution

1 space per 250 sqm

1 space per 1000 sqm

1 space per 500 sqm

1 space per 1000 sqm

C1 Hotels

1 space per 20 bedrooms

1 space per 50 bedrooms

1 space per 20 bedrooms

1 space per 50 bedrooms

E Shops, Financial Professional Services, Restaurants and Cafes

1 space per 150 sqm

1 space per 20 sqm

1 space per 175 sqm

1 space per 40 sqm

E Office, R&D, Light Industry in Residential Area

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 500 sqm

1 space per 125 sqm

1 space per 500 sqm

E Clinic, Health Centre, Crèche, day nursery or centre

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 3 staff

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 5 staff

E Sports facilities, gymnasiums etc.

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 125 sqm

F Schools and Nurseries

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 8 students

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 10 students

F Universities and Colleges

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 8 students

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 10 students

F1 Other uses (including non-residential education and training, libraries, museums, religious institutions etc.)

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 125 sqm

F2 Community Halls

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 125 sqm

F2 Swimming Baths, Ice Rinks, Outdoor Sport or Recreation

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 125 sqm

Drinking Establishments and Takeaways

1 space per 175 sqm

1 space per 20 sqm

1 space per 175 sqm

1 space per 40 sqm

Cinemas, concert halls etc

1 space per 5 staff

1 space per 100 sqm

1 space per 8 staff

1 space per 125 sqm

Sui generis

As per most relevant other standard

Transport Hubs

To be considered on a case by case basis in discussion with the Council

Developments requiring ten or more visitor parking spaces may be required to include within this provision bike share bays, either on the site or at a suitable location within the vicinity that would serve the development if agreed with the Council and appropriate stakeholders. The volume of bays and positioning for these will be determined on a case by case basis, but no more than half of visitor parking provision should be formed of bike share bays as opposed to regular cycle parking.








Appendix E: Car Parking Standards

Use Class

Core Development Area

Other Areas


Maximums

Residential

C2 Residential Institutions

n/a

n/a

C3 Dwelling House 1 Bed

C3 Dwelling House 2 Bed

C3 Dwelling House 3+ Bed

(spaces per unit)

0.3

0.3

0.3

1

C4 Houses of Multiple Occupation
(spaces per unit)

0.5

1

Non-Residential

B2 General Industrial
(spaces per 1500sqm)

0.5

1

B8 Storage and Distribution
(spaces per 1500sqm)

0.5

1

C1 Hotels (spaces per bedroom)

0.5

1

E Shops (spaces per 100sqm)

Car free

1

E Financial / Professional Services (spaces per 100sqm)

Car free

0.5

E Restaurants and Cafes

Car free

n/a

E Office (spaces per 100 sqm)

0.5

1

E R&D, Light Industry in Residential Area (spaces per 150sqm)

0.5

1

E Clinic, Health Centre, Crèche, day nursery or centre

Car free

n/a

E Sports facilities, gymnasiums etc.

Car free

n/a

F.1 Schools and Nurseries

Car free

n/a

F.1 Universities and Colleges

Car free

n/a

F.1 Other uses (including non-residential education and training, libraries, museums, religious institutions etc.)

Car free

n/a

F.2 Community Halls

Car free

n/a

F.2 Swimming Baths, Ice Rinks, Outdoor Sport or Recreation

Car free

n/a

F.2 Shops smaller than 280 sqm mostly selling essential goods, at least 1km from another similar shop

Car free

n/a

Drinking Establishments and Takeaways

Car free

n/a

Cinemas, concert halls etc.

Car free

n/a

Sui generis

As per most relevant other standard

Transport Hubs

To be considered on a case by case basis in discussion with the Council

Where no standard is indicated car parking provision to be considered on a case by case basis in discussion with the Council, with car parking requirements to be evaluated within the Transport Assessment / Statement and will be expected to align with sustainable travel ambitions set out within the Local Plan Chapter 11 'A Sustainable Travel Town'.


Appendix F: Marketing Requirements

A number of policies in the Local Plan require evidence of marketing prior to allowing the redevelopment of change of use of a building or land. This appendix sets out the detailed requirements for marketing to justify that there is no longer a demand for the existing use and therefore to justify a change of use.

Vacant or under-used premises should be continuously marketed under their existing use. Where the premises are in poor condition or have been partially demolished, the exercise should be limited to marketing of the site as a potential redevelopment site to reflect the existing use.

Length of Marketing

Prior to applying to change the use of a building protected under the relevant policies of the Local Plan (retail, employment and community facilities) the property should be marketed for a period of at least 12 months.

Marketing Strategy

Before marketing begins, a strategy should be prepared to demonstrate how the property will be marketed. The marketing strategy should contain:

  • Background – why the property is being marketed.
  • Location – including consideration of context and links to transport networks as well as general setting (i.e. employment area/local centre).
  • Descriptions – including details on floorspace, layout, and car parking as relevant.
  • Planning – a summary of the existing planning use, site history and any restrictions (i.e. Article 4).
  • Marketing Recommendations – this should consider:
    • Basis of instruction – sole agent or joint agent etc.
    • Method of disposal – private treaty or formal/informal bids.
    • Advertisement options – sale boards, internet, PR, publications, mailing etc.
  • Expenditure – the budget for the marketing campaign should be proportionate to the anticipated return from the property. As a guide the budget should be about 3% of the anticipated return from the property (for example, a property with a guide rent of £120,000 per annum should have a marketing budget of around £3,600).
  • Guide Price – this should be commensurate with the current market price for comparable premises. It is expected that the value of the property will be derived from an expert RICS registered value or accredited member of RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors).
  • Guide terms – these should be flexible and take into account prevailing market conditions. The length of leases should not be overly prescriptive.

The strategy should include a marketing matrix similar to the template below.

Marketing Initiative

Budget

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Marketing Board

£xx.xx













Marketing Particulars

£xx.xx













Local Newspaper

£xx.xx













The extent of marketing initiatives will vary based on the type of premises being advertised. However, as a minimum the following initiatives should be employed for all premises:

  • Marketing Board – this should be relative to the type and size of premises. A simple for sale board may be appropriate for small commercial premises and community facilities. For larger commercial units larger boards giving details of the property including the guide price should be employed. Boards should be clearly visible from main transport routes.
  • Marketing Particulars – including the following:
    • Location
    • Internal and external photographs
    • Description of accommodation
    • Terms (leasehold, freehold, long lease etc.)
    • Guide Price/Rent
    • Current planning position
    • Services and Utilities
    • Energy Performance Certificate
    • Rateable value and business rates
    • VAT status
    • Legal and professional costs
    • Contact information for the agent
    • For larger commercial units and tourist accommodation sites, which are more likely to have a regional or national audience, the particulars (including layouts and photos) should be set out in a bespoke brochure.
  • Press Advertisement – for small commercial units and community facilities an advert should be placed and maintained in the local newspaper. For larger commercial units specialist publications should also be used. In addition, for large commercial units a press release should be given to local and regional press.
  • Online Advertisement – the premises should be published on the agent's website as well as at least one national commercial property search engine. For very large or significant commercial units a bespoke website for the property could be created.
  • Targeted Advertisement – where appropriate other providers should be informed directly that the premises is being marketed. This is likely to be particularly relevant for community facilities where there may be a requirement for alternative provision.

Marketing Report

If, following the 12 months of marketing, there has been no success in selling or letting a unit then a report detailing the marketing undertaken and demonstrating compliance with these requirements should be prepared and submitted alongside any planning application for redevelopment or change of use. The marketing period must have ended no more than nine months before the date of submission of a planning application.

The Marketing Report must demonstrate:

  • The original marketing strategy (in accordance with the above requirements).
  • The duration and dates of the marketing campaign (minimum 12 months).
  • Evidence that the marketing strategy was delivered – photos of marketing boards, copies of particulars, screenshots of online adverts, copies of press articles and adverts.
  • A full log of relevant correspondence throughout the marketing campaign. This should include, where relevant, details of reasons why the prospective occupier(s) deemed the premises unsuitable. If any offers were rejected the grounds for rejection must be provided.
  • If the record of enquiries indicated a lack of interest the report should demonstrate measures taken to alter the strategy to increase interest.

In summary, the marketing statement should include all details and evidence of the steps taken to market premises as detailed above. If the Authority is not satisfied that these requirements have been met then additional marketing may be required before the proposal can be considered acceptable.

Appendix G: Glossary

Active travel

Non-motorised travel, such as walking and cycling.

Active frontage

Ground floors where windows and doors face onto the street, avoiding blank walls and which enable people to see into and out of buildings.

Adaptation (Climate Change)

Modifications necessary to maintain life in response to climate change effects and expected negative impacts.

Adaptations (Housing)

Changes made to a home allowing safer, easier access.

Affordable Housing

Housing for sale or for rent for those whose needs are not being met by the market. This includes social rented housing, affordable rented housing and intermediate housing.

Air Quality Management Areas

Identified areas where air quality objectives are not being met.

Agent of Change Principle

The new use is responsible for mitigating any future impacts on existing surrounding uses. Seeks to prevent development creating a negative impact on the local area (for example noise pollution)

Authority Monitoring Report (AMR)

A report that summarises the performance of planning policies and is used to identify how effectively the Local Plan is implemented.

Base

The lower section of a taller building which is seen and experienced from street level.

Bike Share Scheme

A pool of bikes owned by a local authority or private company available for individual use on a short term basis by members.

Biodiversity

The amount of variety in plants, animals and insects within a specific area. Higher amounts of biodiversity are important for sustaining ecosystems and habitats.

Bioswales

Channels which move and hold storm water and run off through vegetation and rock to remove debris and pollutants.

Blue Infrastructure

Networks of water including (but not limited to) rivers, ponds, lakes and canals.

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method)

An assessment that measures the sustainability of a new building including issues related to energy, health and well-being, innovation, land use, materials, management, pollution, transport, waste and water.

Brownfield Land

Land that was previously developed with any type of fixed infrastructure.

Building Regulations

Government standards set for design and construction which apply to most new buildings and alterations to existing buildings in England and Wales.

Car Club

A pool of cars owned by a local authority or private company available for individual use on a short term basis by members.

Carbon Neutral

A combination of reducing and offsetting emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon resulting in no net release.

Carbon Offset

A method to reduce emissions by compensating elsewhere. These offsets are measures in tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent.

Car-lite development

Residential development with minimal or no car parking, where travel is mainly via walking, cycling and public transport.

Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL)

A charge levied on new developments to support infrastructure delivery. Introduced by the Planning Act (2008).

Comparison Retail

Retail items not bought on a frequent basis, for example televisions and white goods (fridges, dishwashers etc).

Conservation Area

An area designated under the Planning Act 1990 (Listed Buildings and Conservation) as being of special historic or architectural interest the character of which should be preserved and enhanced.

Construction Management Plan

A plan to address procedures and methods of construction prior to commencement.

Controlled Parking Zones

An area where all on street parking is controlled and restricted by the local council.

Culvert

An artificial, impermeable channel, tunnel or similar structure which enables water to flow under or through a built up area.

Combined Heat and Power

A power system that generates both heat and electricity.

Curtilage

The boundary of a development site or property.

Delivery and Servicing Plan

A plan to manage logistics of how to provide services such as waste collection and freight delivery to a development.

Demand Responsive Transport (DRT)

Flexible form of bus services that vary routes and timetables according to demand, passengers' book spaces to join at an agreed time and place.

Design and Access Statement

A report statement submitted as part of a planning application which should explain how a proposed development is a suitable response to the site and its setting and how it will be accessed by future users.

Development Contributions

Contribution in the form of money, land or other means collected from developers to deliver infrastructure. This could be through the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) or a Section 106 Agreement as well as onsite contributions.

Endemic

Something that is native and regularly found in a certain area.

Exception Test (Flooding)

A test applied to sites with flood risk, when there are not enough suitable sites with lower or no risk of flooding available for use. The test is required to show that the sites with flood risk will be safe to develop and that any sustainability benefits of developing the site will outweigh the risk of flooding.

Evidence Base

Data collected by a local authority to support and justify policies.

Flexible workspace

Shared working space in new developments, used by residents to work from home.

Flood Risk Assessment

A way to determine the likelihood of flooding in specific areas.

Flood Zones

Areas of land which are mapped by the Environment Agency into flood zones. Flood Zone 1 is least likely to experience a flooding event and Flood Zone 3 has the highest risk.

Green Infrastructure

Networks of green space which are multifunctional and offer environmental and social benefits for the surrounding area. This can include parks and gardens, green corridors, natural areas, amenity spaces and allotments.

Greenhouse Gases

Gases which occur naturally but due to human activity are intensifying climate change effects.

Health Impact Assessment

An assessment of how a proposal may potentially affect health and wellbeing of a population.

Habitable rooms

Any room which is used (or intended to be used) for sleeping, cooking, eating or living. Rooms which are not included would be hallways, service rooms, laundry rooms and bathrooms.

Hardstanding

An area of hard surfacing which is often used for parking.

Hectare (ha)

A unit of measurement commonly used to measure land. 1 hectare = 10,000 square metres = 2.5 acres.

Housing mix

The range of unit sizes (E.G. 1-bed, 2-bed, 3-bed units) and different types of homes (e.g. traditional houses, apartments)

Infill Development

When small areas of vacant land in urban areas are developed.

Intensification

Further development within the existing urban area.

Land Assembly Powers

An organisation that has legal powers to buy property at a fair price to combine land parcels from different ownerships.

Local Centres

An area including shops and facilities for local people.

Locally Listed Building

Buildings, structures or monuments of local interest that contribute to the heritage, identity and streetscape of Watford. Locally listed buildings do not merit statutory listing under the Planning Act (1990), but are considered to be of local architectural or historic value.

Major Development

In terms of residential development, greater than 10 dwellings or 0.5 hectares. In terms of other development, a floorspace increase of greater than 1000 square meters is considered to be major development.

Mansard

In relation to taller buildings this is the middle section of the buildings and is sometimes set in or narrower than the base section.

Mass Rapid Transit (MRT)

Urban transport system capable of carrying large numbers of passengers quickly. Encompasses transport modes that run on roads, rails or a combination of these.

The Metropolitan Green Belt

A statutory designation around London that exists to restrict urban sprawl, protect the countryside from encroachment, stop the merging of towns and encourage the recycling of brownfield land.

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG)

The Government department responsible for planning and local government.

Minor Development

In terms of residential development, less than 10 dwellings or 0.5 hectares. In terms of other development, a floorspace lower than 1000 square meters would be considered to be minor development.

Mixed Use Development

A development that is comprised of different land uses, such as employment and residential uses.

Nationally Listed Building

A building or monument that is protected because of its national historical or architectural interest under the Planning Act (1990).

National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF)

The national policy document which provides the framework to Government policies to guide local planning authorities, particularly when preparing a Local Plan.

Natural Surveillance

When building design encourages people to overlook a space with windows, balconies, front gardens or entrances.

Objectively Assessed Need (OAN)

Using a standardised methodology, the number of new homes required to meet the future needs of the population

Overheating

Discomfort to occupants from high temperatures caused by highly insulated and airtight buildings with inadequate natural or mechanical ventilation systems.

Permeability

Is a measure of the number of alternative routes which are available for movement through an area; areas with a high number of choices are considered to have good permeability.

Place Making

The process of creating high quality accessible places that people want to live, work, play and learn in.

Planning Condition

These can be attached to a planning permission which require a developer to address specific issues

Plot Ratio

The ratio of the floor area of a building to the land on which it sits. It is often used to measure how intensively land is being used.

Policies Map

Areas covered by Local Plan policies and proposals identified on an Ordnance Survey Map.

Pop-up

This is the top section of the building and is the section which is most visible in the skyline and panoramic views across a place.

Positive frontage

An edge or side of a building or a boundary wall/fence with an interesting and well-designed elevation or boundary treatment which provides an engaging and attractive edge to the public space.

Public Realm

Parts of the town that are available for everyone to use, including streets, public squares and open spaces.

Renewable Energy

Energy from renewable sources such as sunlight, wind, rain and geothermal heat. The use of these resources to create energy is sustainable for human consumption.

Retail hierarchy

Classifies and ranks retail areas based upon the role, range of choice, distance people will travel and popularity from outside the town.

Retail impact assessment

An assessment undertaken for an application for retail use (normally on developments over 2,500 square metres gross floorspace, but they may occasionally be necessary for smaller developments, such as those likely to have a significant impact on smaller centres) on the impact of the proposal on the vitality and viability of existing centres within the catchment area of the proposed development. The assessment includes the likely cumulative effect of recent permissions, developments under construction and completed developments.

Riparian

Area adjacent to a river or similar body of water.

Section 106 Agreement

A reference to Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act (1990) allows a local planning authority to enter a legally-binding agreement or planning obligation with a landowner in association with the granting of planning permission. These agreements are a way of delivering or addressing matters that are necessary to make a development acceptable in planning terms. They are used to support the provision of services and infrastructure.

Self-Build and Custom Build Housing

When an individual, or a group of individuals, organises the design and construction of their own home.

Severance Effect

The dividing effects of busy roads on the movement of people and communities.

Single and Dual Aspect

A single aspect dwelling only has windows and openings to the exterior on one side and a dual aspect dwelling has openings and windows to the exterior on at least two sides.

Sequential Test (Flooding)

A test that aims to steer new development to the areas with the lowest probability of flooding.

Sequential Test (Retail)

A test that aims to steer main town centre uses towards town centre locations first. If no town centre locations are available, the test steers the uses towards edge of centre locations next, then out of centre locations

Street Canyon

A street which has tall buildings along both sides which results in the ground level experience being similar to a natural canyon.

Soakaways

A ditch or pit which is filled with loose rock or rubble used to manage water.

Statutory

Something that is required by law.

Sui Generis

A type of land use that is not defined by other land use classifications.

Supplementary Planning Document

A document which supports the Local Plan by providing more detail and guidance on a topic or an area. These are non-statutory documents.

Surface Water Flooding

Flooding caused by rainwater that cannot be absorbed into the ground or is caused by poor drainage systems.

Sustainable Development

Defined by the United Nations General Assembly as 'meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. In terms of planning, the National Planning Policy Framework states that sustainable development should be viewed in a social, economic and environmental context.

Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS)

An approach to drainage which seeks to control the flow of water and reduce the risk of sewer discharge and/or flooding.

Target Emission Rate (TER)

A standard for energy efficiency of a building expressed as kilograms of C02 per square metre.

Tenure

The ownership or rental of a property.

Tenure Blind

Homes designed to make types of housing indistinguishable.

Topography

The shape and relief of the land resulting in a particular and distinctive landscape or town scape, often relating to height above sea level.

Town Centre Uses

Defined by the National Planning Policy Framework as retail development (including warehouse clubs and factory outlet centres); leisure, entertainment and more intensive sport and recreation uses (including cinemas, restaurants, drive-through restaurants, bars and pubs, nightclubs, casinos, health and fitness centres, indoor bowling centres and bingo halls); offices; and arts, culture and tourism development (including theatres, museums, galleries and concert halls, hotels and conference facilities).

Transport Assessment

A comprehensive review that sets out transport issues, and proposed mitigations for these, relating to a proposed development. The assessment also identifies measures to improve accessibility and safety for different travel modes, including walking and cycling.

Travel Plan

A long term management strategy for a site that seeks to encourage sustainable travel.

Urban Grain

The size, shape and pattern of plots, buildings and streets in an area or neighbourhood that are a constituent part of the character of the places.

Use Classes

The Town and Country Planning Order (1987) places different land uses into categories. In practice, changes between use classes are likely to require planning permission. A list of the planning use classes can be found in Appendix B.

Viability

Ensuring that developer costs and policy obligations do not compromise the deliverability of a development.

Water Stress

When the amount of water being consumed exceeds the amount that is readily available for use it leads to water stress. Areas of water stress are determined by the Environment Agency.

Windfall Development

Development sites that are not specifically identified in the Local Plan.

Appendix H: Planning policies to be Superseded by the Watford Local Plan 2018-2036

Policy No.

Title

SE7

Waste Storage, Recovery and Recycling in New Development

SE20

Air Quality

SE21

Air Quality Management Areas

SE22

Noise

SE23

Light Pollution

SE24

Unstable and Contaminated Land

SE25

Potentially Hazardous or Polluting Devt

SE26

Watercourses

SE27

Flood Prevention

SE28

Groundwater Quality

SE36

Replacement Trees and Hedgerows

SE37

Protection of Trees, Woodlands and Hedgerows

SE39

Tree and Hedgerow Protection in New Development

SE40

Landscape Character Assessment

T10

Cycle Parking Standards

T21

Access and Servicing

T22

Car Parking Standards

T24

Residential Development

T26

Car Free Residential Development

H9

Back Garden Development

H10

Planning Agreements for Educational and Community Facilities

H13

Conversions

H14

Conversions: Provision of Family Sized Units

H15

Non-Residential Proposals in Residential Areas

H16

Retention of Affordable Housing

E1

Employment Areas

E2

Employment Use Outside Identified Employment Areas

E5

Environmental Considerations

S5

Non-Retail Uses in Prime Retail Frontage

S6

Non-Retail Uses within the Harlequin Shopping Centre

S7

Secondary Retail Frontage

S9

Non-Retail Uses in North Watford Shopping Centre/Local Shopping Frontages

S11

Use Class A3 Food and Drink

S12

Planning Conditions for Use Class A3 Food and Drink

E2

Employment Use Outside Identified Employment Areas

E5

Environmental Considerations

S5

Non-Retail Uses in Prime Retail Frontage

S6

Non-Retail Uses within the Harlequin Shopping Centre

S7

Secondary Retail Frontage

S9

Non-Retail Uses in North Watford Shopping Centre/Local Shopping Frontages

S11

Use Class A3 Food and Drink

S12

Planning Conditions for Use Class A3 Food and Drink

U15

Buildings of Local Interest

U17

Setting of Conservation Areas

U18

Design in Conservation Areas

U19

Small Scale Developments in Conservation Areas

U20

Demolition in Conservation Areas

U24

Shopfronts

U25

Advertisements and Signs

Core Strategy 2006-2031 Policies

Policy No

Title



Vision

Vision of Watford in 2031

SO1

A Family Friendly Town Centre

SO2

Sustainable Neighbourhoods

SO3

Enhance Watford's regional, economic and transportation role

SO4

Enhance Watford's regional health, recreational, educational, cultural and social role.

SO5

Enhance Watford's environment, green infrastructure and heritage assets.

SS1

Spatial Strategy

SPA1

Town Centre

SPA2

Watford Junction

SPA3

Health Campus

SPA4

Lower High Street

SPA5

Dome Roundabout

SPA6

Western Gateway

IP1

Croxley Rail Link

IP2

Abbey Flyer

IP3

Watford Junction Interchange

SD1

Water

SD2

Climate Change

TLC1

Town Centre Development

TLC2

Neighbourhood Centres

HS1

Housing Supply and Site Selection

HS2

Housing Mix

HS3

Affordable Housing

HS4

Gypsies and Travellers

EMP1

Economic Development

EMP2

Employment Land

T1

Regional Transport Node

T2

Location of New Development

T3

Improving Accessibility

T4

Transport Assessments

T5

Providing New Infrastructure

INF1

Infrastructure Delivery and Planning Obligations

UD1

Delivering High Quality Design

UD2

Built Heritage Conservation

GI1

Green Infrastructure

GI2

Green Belt

GI3

Biodiversity

GI4

Sports and Recreation

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